Community Engagement

Build With, Not For: A #CivicTech Manifesto

July 3, 2014

Crafting high-quality civic technology — projects and tools designed withsocial impact in mind — requires thought, creativity, and intentionality — the strength to ask:

“Will this project actually have social impact? Is it being designed for the social/cultural/political context in which it will be implemented? And if not, what steps do we need to take and what people do we need to substantially involve to get there?”

4 Tips for Organizing Unstructured Events Without Going Insane

July 2, 2014

Crafting high-quality civic technology — projects and tools designed withsocial impact in mind — requires thought, creativity, and intentionality — the strength to ask:

“Will this project actually have social impact? Is it being designed for the social/cultural/political context in which it will be implemented? And if not, what steps do we need to take and what people do we need to substantially involve to get there?”

On Accountability and Audience: Why We Didn't Have a Funk Parade Hackathon

June 27, 2014

Crafting high-quality civic technology — projects and tools designed with social impact in mind — requires thought, creativity, and intentionality — the strength to ask:

“Will this project actually have social impact? Is it being designed for the social/cultural/political context in which it will be implemented? And if not, what steps do we need to take and what people do we need to substantially involve to get there?”

Our approach to community-building in the name of civic tech should be the same.

So You Think You Want to Run a Hackathon? Think Again. (A Case Study on #CivicTech Events)

June 23, 2014



This article is an excerpt from a longer piece originally posted on Medium. Click here for the full story.


 

“Hackathons.” That’s one of the most popular answers to a question you haven’t asked yet: How do you organize your local tech community to do X/attend Y/engage with Z?

Digital Stewardship and your community

April 18, 2014
Person on building OTI has partnered with groups around the world to develop the concept of Digital Stewardship, and hopes to refine it as more communities adopt and adjust it for local needs. Digital Stewardship is a principled approach to community technology that emphasizes self-governance and sustainability. Digital Stewards grow and maintain the technology their communities need to foster healthy relationships, build resilience, and increase access to critical information. OTI works with local partners to integrate the Digital Stewards approach into the group’s existing projects, missions, and goals.

A Network Model of Broadband Adoption: Using Twitter to Document Detroit Future

  • By
  • Joshua Breitbart,
  • Greta Byrum,
  • Georgia Bullen,
  • Kayshin Chan,
  • New America Foundation
May 1, 2014

From 2010 to 2012, the Detroit Digital Justice Coalition (DDJC) conducted a federally-funded training program in digital media that they called “Detroit Future.” The purpose of the program was to use broadband adoption as a means of strengthening economic development and community organizing in Detroit. To that end, the DDJC developed a “networked” model of broadband adoption as part of its implementation of the program. The coalition documented the program with the Twitter hashtag #detroitfuture.

Dialing Down Risks: Mobile Privacy and Information Security in Global Development Projects

  • By
  • Hibah Hussain,
  • New America Foundation
August 22, 2013

Over the past decade, mobile phones have become increasingly prominent features of global development projects. Aiming to spur social and economic development in the Global South, a variety of international organizations and nonprofits have invested heavily in mobile-centric projects to address challenges in public health, financial inclusion, transparent governance, and more.

Call for Paper Proposals

July 2, 2013

Call for Paper Proposals

The Role of Advocacy in Media and Telecom Policy

A by-invitation experts’ workshop
New America Foundation
Sept. 29 - Oct. 1, 2013

Special Section in the International Journal of Communications on Meaningful Broadband Adoption

December 19, 2012
Photo by RTlibrary, licensed by Creative Commons.

Since 2009, the federal government has funded 232 Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) digital training and access projects nationwide. New America Foundation’s Open Technology Institute (OTI) is a partner on two of them, in Detroit and Philadelphia. As these programs draw to a close at the end of 2012, researchers, policymakers, and practitioners are taking stock of the impact and outcomes of one of the largest and most comprehensive digital inclusion efforts ever undertaken.

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